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WhoCanISue.com: Bad Taste Mockery or Marketing Genius?

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WhoCanISue.com has ridiculous written all over it yet, Time magazine recently published an article about the new attorney referral marketing website that’s all set to go live next month.

Right from its name, to its “slip on a banana peel” graphics, to its tagline “The Legal Process Made Easy,” the website makes a mockery of our tort system of accountability. It infers that holding a wrongdoer financially accountable for injuries they have caused is easy. It makes fun of lawyers and lawsuits, implying that lawsuits are frivolous and an easy way to make easy money. It isn’t enough that Time magazine wrote about it but night time talk show hosts are making jokes about it and lawyers are complaining about it on their blog which combined has flooded the website with traffic and it isn’t even live yet.

WhoCanISue.com isn’t even a law firm marketing for clients they intend to represent. WhoCanISue.com is a “referral” website, meaning the sponsors of the site are not looking to perform legal work for prospective clients. This is a pure advertising site. Personal injury attorneys pay money to advertise on the site in hopes of attracting new clients to themselves. WhoCanISue.com makes money by selling space on the website to attorneys.

Why would any trial attorney who takes pride in his work participate with WhoCanISue.com and perpetuate the urban myth of an injury combined with a lawsuit equals easy money? Come on, the home page shows a man in a suit slipping and falling on a banana peel. It’s nothing better than a bad caricature and a tired stereotype.

WhoCanISue.com’s tagline is laughable. “The Legal Process Made Easy” — Are you kidding me? Any respected personal injury attorney who is experienced with litigation and actually takes their cases to court knows that the legal process is NEVER easy. It takes lot of time, money, man hours, effort, stress and very hard work to take a case to court.

And here is what really gets me – this website just may be marketing genius. As much as I despise the approach and the innuendos, the creator has generated a huge amount of focus on his business, has had tens of thousands of visitors to his website, is the latest darling of the tort reformers and lots of attorneys are talking about his website. My website has not gotten that kind of attention or traffic in ten years. Who can I sue?

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  • vincent celentano

    Genius maybe? Lucky, more likely. Do you know which late night talk show we were on and when? Thanks

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